WEEKLY DOSE #15 presents NICOLAS BOYER

WEEKLY DOSE #15 presents NICOLAS BOYER

Featured image :  MARKKO JARRON

A WEEK WITH NICOLAS BOYER

Welcome to the 15th WEEKLY DOSE

Good morning Folks. It’s Monday and the  WEEKLY DOSE, your weekly dose of  documentary  increased with street photography, comes back!
Welcome to Iran !

We decided to dedicate this week to a french photographer  the very talented Nicolas Boyer.
Bur for us, he presents a powerful and sensitive photography work made in Iran.
We take this opportunity to remind you that you can of course contact us to propose complete series.

She has sent us 7 images from his wonderful work with which we will spend this week here, but also on our Facebook  and our Instagram

NICOLAS BOYER

Nicolas Boyer is a french photographer, film producer.
He studied at l’Ecole des Gobelins.

He made a brief stay in the world of reporting between 2003-2005 to finally become a member of the studio hans lucas in 2016.
He left for Iran between 2017-2018 to work on Iranian society. The latter being torn between the contradictions between public representation and private life, the past and modernism.

Bam-e Tehran (« Roof of Tehran » at the height of 1800 meters above sea level) is a place in the Alborz mountains to enjoy the fresh air away from the pollution of the city center. Many locals also like to go there to take a break from the pressure of the religion ; and women often catch the opportunity to let the tchador slide above their shoulders.

THEARAN / Jomhouri district
. A woman without her hidjab inside her building and 3 women wearing their tchador outside.

TEHRAN / Central bazaar Procession of Ashura (the « Day of Remembrance ») which commemorates the death of Husayn ibn Ali, the grandson of Muhammad at the Battle of Karbala (680 AD). Ashura happens during Muharram, the first & holiest month of the Islamic calendar.

A taxi driver wearing a mask because of the high level of pollution.

TEHRAN / Jomhouri district

TEHRAN / Around Ab-o-Atash skatepark

Kashan historical houses (« Khan-e ») belonged to wealthy families, often merchants, who built them in the late 18th century. They consist of courtyards, wall paintings, elegant stained glass windows, and other classic features of traditional Persian residential architecture, such as the separation between « biruni » (the public common area) & « andaruni » (the private/women’s quarters).

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Hello, Here is the submission form of your images for the Weekly dose, your indispensable dose of weekly photojournalism.

Feel free to send us your picture (only one!)  until Friday evening! Each Monday, we will present our selection of 7 photographers.

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